Planet dgplug

May 03, 2016

Kushal Das

dgplug.org is now using Lektor

Couple of years back we moved dgplug into a static website. But still there are requirements when we do want to update parts of the site in a timely manner. We also wanted to track the changes. We tried to maintain a sphinx based docs, but somehow we never managed to do well in that case.

This Sunday Suraj, Chandan, and /me were having a casual discussion, and the site management came up. I knew Armin wrote something new in the static sites side, but never managed to look into it. From the website of Lektor:

A flexible and powerful static content management system for building
complex and beautiful websites out of flat files — for people who do not
want to make a compromise between a CMS and a static blog engine.

So Lektor is for static cms, and that is what I was looking for. The dependency chain also looked reasonable. As usual documentation is in great shape. Yesterday I spent some time to setup a Fedora container which has Lektor inside along with a small flask based webapp. Sayan helped to fix the template/CSS issues.The web application listens for events from github webhoooks, and rebuilds the site. You can find the source for our site here, and the container Dockerfile and other details are here. Note: The web application is actually very crude in nature :)

by Kushal Das at May 03, 2016 06:44 AM

May 02, 2016

Dhriti Shikhar

Machine Learning

Learning

To gain knowledge or understanding or skill through:

  • study
  • instruction
  • experience

 

Machine Learning

The field of study that gives computers the ability to learn without the need of explicitly programming.

The goal is to device programs that learn and improve performance with experience without human intervention.

 

Training Data

  1. Set of examples (input -> output) for learning
  2. Used to build model

 

Test data

  1. Used to test:
    • how good your model can predict
    • estimate model properties
  2. It is always outside training data set but follows some probability distribution as training data

 

Feature

  1. also called predictor
  2. It is a meaningful attribute
  3. Internal representation of data
  4. quantity describing an instance
  5. property of an instance

 

Tuple

  1. A Record in data base
Screenshot from 2016-05-02 23-34-01Features are columns and Tuples are rows

 

If we increase the number of records, attributes in a data set, then Machine Learning problem also becomes a Big Data problem.

 

Supervised learning

  1. It uses training data set consisting of input -> correct output to train the model
  2. Example:
    • Page Ranking Algorithm
    • Next word recommendation in Instant Messaging Application/ Whatsapp/ SMS

 

Unsupervised learning

  1. No training data set exists
  2. Most difficult algorithms are unsupervised learning because there is no “fixed” objective.
  3. used in Explaratory Data Analysis (EDA)
  4. Example:
    • used in recommendation systems to determine users who are similar to me from existing database

 

tiff infomationMachine Learning types

 

 Classification  Clustering
We have a set of pre-defined classes and we want to know which class a new object belongs to. Group a set of objects and find whether there is some relationship between objects.
It is predictive modelling. We give          pre-defined groups and predict group of new data. It is descriptive modelling. We try to find groups which occur naturally in data .

 

Classification

There are 6 items categorised in 2 classes:

tiff infomationExample of Classification

 

Each category has a label e.g. Eatables and Non-Eatables. If we have to predict the class of a new item “strawberry”, then it will be assigned a label “Eatable”

 

Clustering

There are 6 items categorised in 2 groups:

tiff infomationExample of Clustering

 

Each category is unnamed i.e. there is no label attached to the group. If we have to predict the group of a new item “strawberry” then it will be in the first group.

 

Accuracy

  1. How often is the prediction correct?
  2. Accuracy is not reliable metric for real performance of model because it will yield misleading results if training data set is unbalanced (i.e.  number of samples in different classes vary greatly).
  3. Example:
    1. Let number of cats be 95 and number of dogs be 5
    2. Classifier can easily bias into classifying all samples as cats
    3. Overall acuuracy = 95%
    4. BUT 100% recognition rate for cats and 0% recognition rate for dogs
  4. One of the ways to improve accuracy is to provide more balanced data.

 

This is one of the interesting things explained by Satish Patil in Pune Python Meetup that:

There is no right or wrong model. There is no best or worst model. There is ONLY useful and non-useful model. 

Nobody knows how much percentage of accuracy is good. How much accuracy is needed depends on Business Context.

Consider a company which wants to launch a new product and they want the probability of success of the product using Machine Learning. So, it is the company which DECIDES that if they get probability below 60%, then they will not launch the product. So, this is not something that the developer decides. This totally depends on the business context.

 

Market Basket Analysis

  1. Also called affinity analysis
  2. Association Rule:
    • discovering interesting relation/connection/association between specific objects
  3. Sometimes, certain products are typically purchased together like:
    • beer and chips
    • beer and diapers
    • bread and eggs
    • shampoo and conditioner
  4. So, market basket analysis tells a retailer that promotion involving just one of the items from the set would likely drive sales of the other
  5. This technique is used by retailers to:
    • improve product placement
    • marketing
    • new product development
    • making discount plans

 

Titanic Data Set

The titanic data set was used in the machine learning talk in Pune Python Meetup. It can be downloaded here.

There are some features in the data set which can be ignored as they are not important like:

  • Passenger ID
  • Name
  • Ticket Number
  • Cabin

and there are some important features which help in classifying like:

  • Survived
  • Gender

 

Impurity Measure

  1. Measures how well are the classes separated
  2. Should be 0 when all data belong to one class

 

Entropy

  1. Entropy can be a measure of quality of model
  2. It is a measure of how distributed are the probabilities.
  3. The more equal is the share for the probability values in all the classes, the higher is the entropy.  The more skewed is the share among the classes, lesser is the entropy.
  4. The goal in machine learning is to get a very low entropy in order to make the most accurate decisions and classifications

 

Decision Tree

  1. A way of graphically representing an sequential decision process
  2. Non-leaf nodes are labelled with attribute/ question
  3. Leaf nodes are labelled with class
tiff infomationdecision tree based on titanic data set

 

Pruning

  1. Data can contain noise:
    • instance can contain error
    • wrong classification
    • wrong attribute value
  2. If a particular feature is not used by a tuple or if the feature is not influencing, then it is removed.

 

Data Preprocessing

  1. Converting data into interval form
  2. Machine learning algorithms learn from data so its important to feed it the right data
  3. Data preprocessing basically involves:
    • correcting mistakes
    • handle missing values
    • handle outliers
    • normalize values
    • nominal values

 

Missing Value

  1. The value of an attribute which is not known or does not exist
  2. Example:
    • value was not measured
    • instrument malfunction
    • attribute does not apply
  3. If a column contains “Not Available”, then it is NOT considered as a missing value.

 

Outliers

  1. samples which are far away from other samples
  2. They can be mistake/ noise or represent a special behaviour
  3. Outliers are generally removed

 

Questions that were asked in meetup

  1. Can data be extended to multiple dimension?
  2. Can distance be other than Euclidian?
    • Yes, Manhattan distance
  3. Are there online courses that teach ML intro?
    • Yes
  4. What is “k” in k-means?
    • k is no. of clusters
  5. Can we use ML for trading?
    • Yes
  6. Any daily life clustering example
  7. Any software product based on unsupervised learning?
    • Google Maps
    • Matrimony/ Dating websites
    • Red Coupon (real estate)
    • Amazon recommendation
    • Netflix
  8. Order in which features is given, is that important?
    • No
  9. Why do we say that one model is better than the other?
  10. What if accuracy is not the concern?
    • Accuracy is one way of looking at prediction
  11. Do you think that if model changes, something in feature has changed?
  12. We have tools like WEKA, so why would anyone prefer Python or R?
    • depends on the language available or language the company uses
  13. How do we know that a particular feature is important or not?
  14. What if some features are more influential than others? How will the decision tree be affected?
  15. How to handle outliers in a decision tree?
  16. Will the algorithm figure out the relationship between input and output?
    • This is possible through Regression

 


by Dhriti Shikhar at May 02, 2016 06:57 PM

April 30, 2016

Dhriti Shikhar

Event Report: April Pune Python Meetup

April Pune Python Meetup (@PythonPune) was conducted on April 30, 2016 at Redhat, Pune. Around 70 people registered for the meetup but the turnout was around 72-73. A few people registered on the spot.

Python Pune Meetups are organised by Chandan Kumar (@ciypro) who is a fellow RedHat employee, a python programmer and FOSS enthusiast who has contributed to many upstream projects.

The meetup started around 10:45 with the introduction where everybody introduced themselves. Almost everybody knew python. There were 1-2 people who did not know python. There were a few people who were experience in machine learning and some who were completely new to Machine Learning. I had a course on machine learning in my college where i learnt the theory and did some practical assignments in R language. The crowd was diverse consisting of students, data scientists, professors and people of various age groups 18 – 70.

This speakers of this meetup were Satish Patil (@DataGeekSatish) and Sudarshan Gadhave (@sudarshan1989) who took a session on Introduction to Machine Learning. 

4Satish Patil in Pune Python Meetup

 

5Sudarshan Gadhave in Pune Python Meetup

Satish Patil is the Founder and Chief Data Scientist of Lemoxo Technologies, Pune where he advises companies large and small on their data strategy. He has 10+ years of research experience in the field of drug discovery and development. He told a few real life machine learning examples from his field in the meetup!

Satish is passionate about applying technology, artificial intelligence, design thinking and cognitive science to better understand, predict and improve business functions. He has a great interest in Machine Learning, Artificial Intelligence, Data Visualisation, Big Data.

Satish covered the following topics:

  • What is Machine Learning
  • The Black Box of Machine Learning
  • features
  • training and test data set
  • classification
  • clustering
  • pure and impure states
  • entropy
  • decision tree
  • supervised and unsupervised learning
  • market basket analysis
  • data pre-processing
  • Titanic data set
  • K means algorithm

Although Machine Learning is a vast concept and it definetly requires more sessions to grasp, but Satish made a remarkable effort in making us understand all the above topics in layman terms.

There are a lot of books, courses, material available online for Machine Learning, so why this meetup? Well, the best part about this meetup was the way Satish explained the BUSINESS CONTEXT of MACHINE LEARNINGThis was something new for me to learn. Getting to know the real life examples from the entrepreneur-cum-data scientist was really interesting.

1.jpgThe Machine Learning Workshop in Pune Python Meetup

The details of his talk will be in my next blog.

Chandan Kumar talked about Fedora Labs. The Fedora science spin comes pre-installed with essential tools for scientific and numerical work like IDE, tools and libraries for programming in Python, C, C++, Java and R. It basically eliminates the need to download a bunch a scientific packages which you need.

If you need any help regarding the spin, you can get help from #fedora-science channel on Freenode on IRC.

As Chandan Kumar ALWAYS encourages us to contribute to open source, he introduced us to WHAT CAN I DO FOR FEDORA?. Pune Python meetups and Devsprint are a great platform to seek for help if you want to contribute to opensource.

3Chandan Kumar in Pune Python Meetup

 

Thanks to Satish Patil and Sudarshan Gadhave for conducting an awesome workshop! We hope to see more such workshops by you in the meetups.

Thanks to RedHat for the food, beverages and venue.

Thanks to Chandan Kumar, Pravin Kumar (@kumar_pravin), Amol Kahat, Sudhir Verma for organising such interesting meetups where we always learn something new:)

 

 


by Dhriti Shikhar at April 30, 2016 07:44 PM

April 27, 2016

Trishna Guha

Publish Docker image with Automated build

docker1

Docker is an open source tool that helps us to develop, ship and run applications.  Each and every application needs a Dockerfile. Instructions are written over Dockerfile in a layered/step-by-step structure to run the application. The Dockerfile is then built to create Docker image. We can then push the image either to Docker Hub or keep it in our Workstation. Finally to run the application we have to run container from the image which can be treated as a concept like an instance of the image since we can have more than one container of a single image. If the Docker image is not in our local Workstation we first have to pull the image from Docker hub and then run container from it. But when we need to make changes in Dockerfile(as needed to make changes in application) we have to build a new Docker image again from it. Or we can make change in the container we are running and commit it but that doesn’t reflect the Dockerfile which contains all the instructions to run an application say it for development or production purpose. Also building Docker image locally from Dockerfile makes us doing things like build, push and all manually. Automating build of Docker image from Dockerfile that is either on Github or Bitbucket is the only solution for this:) .

In Short:  We first create Dockerfile and then push it to Github or Bitbucket. After authenticating Github account with Dockerhub we choose repository on Dockerhub from Github that contains the Dockerfile. After that the Dockerfile triggers build which in result creates Docker image getting ready to pull.

I will share an example of making a CentOS image having Apache httpd server pre-installed.

First we need to create a Dockerfile which can be viewed here.

FROM centos:centos6
MAINTAINER trishnag <trishnaguha17@gmail.com>
RUN yum -y update; yum clean all
RUN yum -y install httpd
RUN echo "This is our new Apache Test Site" >> /var/www/html/index.html
EXPOSE 80
RUN echo "/sbin/service httpd start" >> /root/.bashrc 

Then push the Dockerfile to Github. I have created a repository named CentOS6-Apache and pushed the Dockerfile to it. The repository can be found here.

After doing so

  • Go to DockerHub and Settings —> Linked Account —> Link your Github account.
  • Create —> Create Automated Build —> Create Auto-build Github.
  • Select the repository that contains Dockerfile of your application.
  • Create followed by the Automating build process.

After the image is built successfully you will be able to see something like `docker pull <username>/centos6-apache` which indicates that the image is successfully built. The Image is live on docker hub https://hub.docker.com/r/trishnag/centos6-apache.

Now we have to test the image to make sure whether Apache httpd server is actually pre-installed or not.

docker pull trishnag/centos6-apache  #Pull the image from Dockerhub
docker run -t -i -d trishnag/centos-apache /bin/bash #Run the container as daemon
docker ps #Get the name of the container

CONTAINER ID IMAGE COMMAND CREATED STATUS PORTS NAMES
8bcd1199bb8f trishnag/centos6-apache "/bin/bash" 2 minutes ago Up 2 minutes 80/tcp jovial_cray

docker logs jovial_cray #To see What is happening on bash of container.Gives httpd status
docker inspect jovial_cray | grep IPAddress #Shows the IPAddress
curl 172.17.0.1 #curl the IPAddress we got
This is our new Apache Test Site

We just have got the text that we echoed out to index.html. Hence we can finally come to conclusion that Apache httpd server has already been pre-installed in the image.

Now even if we commit changes to the Dockerfile on Github we really don’t have to worry about the image. The build process of Docker image starts automatically once any changes are committed to Dockerfile. When we pull the newly built image and run container we will be able to find those changes.

Automating build process really makes our life easier.

Resources:

 


by Trishna Guha at April 27, 2016 06:53 PM

April 23, 2016

Farhaan Bukhsh

GSoC-2016

“Woaaahhh! It is accepted” that was me when I saw my proposal got accepted. I had goosebumps, it’s a very big achievement for me to get through GSoC.

This started way back when I went for the last years BangPypers meetup, I met Sayan there , wearing that Dgplug T-shirt, he gave all the links he could for starting with open source.

I enrolled myself for Dgplug Summer Training, and that was it, I learnt so many things and got amazing supportive mentors like Sayan, Kushal and Pierre(pingou).

My connection with fedora projects started from then and there, and cut back now I am into GSoC because of Pagure. This makes me feel so humble and excited , it is just that you need to keep moving and working hard , things will fall in place.

FSMK has been a great support for me, introducing me to FOSS and telling us to spread the movement. Vignesh has been a constant support and motivator for me , he has been someone who actually pushed me beyond my limits to make things work.

Mentors at Jnaapti, Gautham Pai Sir and Shreelakshmi Ma’m, they have been a constant source of inspiration, they have seen  the urge to learn in me and they have been working on me to make me better.

I don’t know what to say, I am just overwhelmed with the result.

I will be spending my summer working on Pagure and making it the best code reviewing system out there.

I will put the proposal link as soon as it is uploaded to fedora-wiki.

EDIT: The link to fedora-wiki proposal .


by fardroid23 at April 23, 2016 01:08 AM

April 18, 2016

Kushal Das

Event report: rootconf 2016

Rootconf is the largest DevOps, and Cloud infrastructure related conference in India. This year’s event happened on 14-15th April in the MLR convention center, Bangalore. I traveled on the day one of the event from Pune. Woke up by 3AM in the morning, and then took the first flight to Bangalore. Picked up Ramky on my way to the venue. Managed to skip most of the (in)famous Bangalore traffic thanks to a govt holiday.

I carried the Fedora standee, and the table cloth from Pune, we set up the Fedora table in the conference. Meanwhile the place was getting full with attendees. We found so many ex-foss.in friends. Premshree, Pankaj, Raj, Vasundhar and many others I met after years. There were 300+ attendees in the event.

I should also mention about the Cat5 cable lanyard.

The day started with Zainab welcoming everyone is super fast manner :) The first talk of the day was “ Happiness through Crash-Only software” by Antoine Grondin. The whole idea that failure is part of life, and we will make our software even more complex by trying to avoid is something we all should keep in mind. He gave some ideas about how Digital Ocean works in the back. Instead of a normal start/end he explained how having recovering from failed state as start, and considering that the process will fail at the end can help. Seeing hand drawn slides was another exciting thing for me, I was doing that quite a lot in my previous talks.

The next talk was from Raj Shekhar, who gave an overview of Mesos. Even in the limited time, his talk was a very right fit while still describing the use case. This was the first time I listened to a talk about Mesos, and it was a very good one.

After this during tea break we moved out the booth/table. We had Ramky, Lalatendu, Aditya, /me, and rtnpro in the table talking to the attendees. The Fedora DVD(s), and badges went out like hot cakes :) Through out two days we had many questions related to Project Atomic, the great looking stickers actually helped to get more attention. In between, I went through the details of my talk to Raj, he provided some valuable input.

Food is always great in hasgeek events, but having so many food startups from Bangalore in one place seriously added new flavor to the conference. hasgeek is not only growing itself, but making sure that they have a great community all across the conference, from talks to food, everything.

Rest of the day 1 we spent talking to people in, and around booth area. hasgeek gets some great recording done of their talks, so we can view them in future :) In the evening we had the dinner at the venue, once again too tasty food :) I went to rtnpro’s house by 10pm as I still wanted to work on my slides.

Day 2

Photo by Lalatendu (Photo by Lalatendu)

Woke up by 6:30AM, and went through my slides once again. The title of my talk was “Failure at Cloud and rescued by Python”. The agenda of the talk was to encourage DevOps/Sys-admins to write Python scripts than shell scripts. It was the first talk of the day. I hope it went well, the slides are available here. As I mentioned Ansible in my talk, we had many Ansible questions asked in the Fedora booth.

Next was Premshree, who talked about “Continuous deployment at Scale” with the detailed example of how they handle things at Etsy. Glad to see that they use a IRC bot to do the deployment :)

After lunch I attended “Working in and with Open Source Communities” from Bernd Erk. This talk was full with tips about communities, how to treat everyone as member. One major point was about a community leader who should become the balance between the people who talk the most, and the silent ones of the community. He also emphasized about getting new members in the community as “Because you will die someday” :)

Rest of the day we again spent in and around of the Fedora booth. Met Tarun Dua after a long time. I came back in a late night flight to Pune. I will post the links to the talk videos when I get it.

by Kushal Das at April 18, 2016 08:13 AM

April 16, 2016

Suraj Deshmukh

All in one Kubernetes cluster on Fedora

This tutorial will walk through the installation steps of Kubernetes, which will run Kubernetes Master and Kubernetes Node on the same machine. Setup a Fedora VM and follow along

Install required packages:

sudo -i
dnf -y install --enablerepo=updates-testing kubernetes etcd iptables

Create a entry for localhost, fed-master and fed-minion. These are all 127.0.0.1 because we are doing all-in-one setup. We are also adding localhost entry because sometime not having this has caused failure.

echo "127.0.0.1 localhost
127.0.0.1 fed-master
127.0.0.1 fed-node
" >> /etc/hosts

Disable and Stop iptables and firewalld

systemctl disable iptables-services firewalld
systemctl stop iptables-services firewalld

File /etc/kubernetes/apiserver should look like as follows. Make sure service-cluster-ip-range does not overlap with any of network attached to your machine

# The address on the local server to listen to.
KUBE_API_ADDRESS="--insecure-bind-address=0.0.0.0"

# Comma separated list of nodes in the etcd cluster
KUBE_ETCD_SERVERS="--etcd-servers=http://127.0.0.1:2379"

# Address range to use for services
KUBE_SERVICE_ADDRESSES="--service-cluster-ip-range=10.254.0.0/16"

# Add your own!
KUBE_API_ARGS=""

Make /var/run/kubernetes

mkdir /var/run/kubernetes
chown kube:kube /var/run/kubernetes
chmod 750 /var/run/kubernetes

Start all the services required for Kubernetes Master and Kubernetes Node both

for SERVICES in etcd kube-apiserver kube-controller-manager kube-scheduler kube-proxy kubelet docker; do
	systemctl restart $SERVICES
	systemctl enable $SERVICES
	systemctl status $SERVICES
done

If all the services started correctly that means that Kubernetes all-in-one cluster is set and you can use it. Here are some optional steps to verify if this cluster is setup.

Create a pod definition like this below

# cat pod.json 
{
    "apiVersion": "v1",
    "kind": "Pod",
    "metadata": {
        "labels": {
            "app": "apache-centos7"
        },
        "name": "apache-centos7"
    },
    "spec": {
        "containers": [
            {
                "image": "centos/httpd",
                "name": "apache-centos7",
                "ports": [
                    {
                        "containerPort": 80,
                        "hostPort": 80,
                        "protocol": "TCP"
                    }
                ]
            }
        ]
    }
}

Create a pod using that pod definition

# kubectl create -f ./pod.json 
pod "apache-centos7" created

See if that pod is created

# kubectl get pod
NAME             READY     STATUS    RESTARTS   AGE
apache-centos7   0/1       Pending   0          48s

Wait until the pod’s status changes from Pending to Running

# kubectl get pod
NAME             READY     STATUS    RESTARTS   AGE
apache-centos7   1/1       Running   0          5m

Get the IP address of the Pod

# kubectl describe pod apache-centos7 | grep 'IP:'
IP:		172.17.0.1

See for yourself the output

# curl 172.17.0.1

Ref:


by surajssd009005 at April 16, 2016 12:58 PM

Tosin Damilare James Animashaun

After DjangoGirls, What Next?

These are my thoughts to the "girls" who stormed Lagos for Django. But I'd recommend same to any attendee of a DjangoGirls workshop anywhere.


My recent foray into the social circle of techies has proven to me that growth is often driven by community. Hence, the first advice I'll offer is that you take DjangoGirls back to your city.

The organizer of DjangoGirls Lagos, Aisha Bello herself only attended this event for the first time about a year ago. Isn't it wonderful that she's been able to put up two of such events within this period? Even though not everyone of you might be able to replicate what she has done, I encourage the few ones among you who can, to endeavour to.

Also endeavour to join communities; create them if they don't exist. For starters, the Nigeria Python Users Group has a mailing list where you can get updates on the Python community in Nigeria as well as a Slack community where you can interact with other programmers.


Did you get the contacts of your mentors? If you didn't, head over to the DjangoGirls Lagos page and get their Twitter handles. Bug them! Well, don't annoy them, but do not hesitate to ask them questions when you're stuck. They'd be glad to help, I'm sure.

And really, the learning goes both ways. Post-workshop, one of the participants of the workshop showed me an error she had encountered, and I was glad to learn that by tinkering with it, she found her way out of the maze. But that's not all. From seeing her approach, I picked up new knowledge from it too.


This post is meant to give you a quasi-roadmap of some sort, which you don't have to follow religiously but keep close enough to consult when you're lost.

So you learnt Python alongside one of its most popular frameworks: Django; and now you can code the next Facebook (Oh, were you told you could only build blogs with that new super power you picked up?) Now, I think the world has more blogging apps than we can keep track of, don't you think so?

So get creative; I assure you you've gotten past the first and most basic hurdle to creating just about any kind of web app: a social network or an e-commerce platform or something else that's interesting. Think of how important this is in an age when everything is moving to the web. You've definitely gotten a head start!

But you'd need to be prepared to learn new stuff as you go. Don't let that put you off as those things would be equally exciting. And you don't have to know it all before you begin; you can learn on-the-job.


Speaking of what you learnt at the workshop, I'm sure you know you were merely introduced to the technologies, not taught comprehensively. In my opinion, you may need to go over the whole tutorial again; then try to build something different (like a ToDo application) from the example shown. Afterwards, for some more comprehensive Python tutorial that is hands-on, try codecademy. It'll be fun, trust me.

There are several tutorials available on web platforms Youtube, Edx, Coursera, and Udacity among others. Who knows, you could build the next e-school for Africa. Pick any of these courses, and try to follow along. You don't have to be in a hurry, although you may find yourself skipping stuff you have already learnt.

I'll advise you pick up some Javascript as you go. I assure you that a mix of skills in these two languages will empower you so well.

I also recommend you put up blog posts as you learn new stuff as if to teach same to others (teaching is a proven way to better learn anything). Medium would be a good place to start, but there are several alternatives. You should also read blogs often. Let me mention that Django Girls has a blog you might be interested in checking out and so does PyLadies. See more interesting Python blogs here


During the workshop, I told my mentees that Python is a suitable language for such a workshop for three reasons:

  1. It's easy to learn.
  2. It's platform-independent.
  3. It has a lot of application domains.

Take caution not to misinterpret reason-1 to mean "easy to master" (See answer to "Is Python easy to master?"), especially because of reason-3: "Python has a lot of application domains". Be it scientific, systems administration, machine learning/artificial intelligence, statistical data analysis, game development or scripting, web scraping, and web development. For those with IoT in mind, especially with Raspberry Pi and or Arduino, Python is readily applicable to those platforms.

So you see there's quite a long way to go, yet with what little knowledge you've gained, you're able to achieve something worthwhile.


Moving on, you can share your work with others, and work collaboratively. You were introduced to version-controlling using Git and Github, which are well worth some learning time. You can learn Git through this course. Don't worry if you don't get it all at once, I struggled through this too at first. This video by Git evangelist, Scott Chacon also deals a good deal on the subject.


How much time it'd take to become quite comfortable with all of this would depend on three things:

  1. Your interest
  2. Your consistency
  3. Your learning speed

However, I'd say 6 months should be fine. Within this time you would have learnt enough to kick-start an exciting project. In fact, some people might have gotten halfway with some project in this time.


Good luck in your programming journey!

by Tosin Damilare James Animashaun at April 16, 2016 12:55 PM

April 14, 2016

Farhaan Bukhsh

Code to Draw

“Wow! I can do this?” this was my reaction when I was introduced to DOT.

Now the question arises what is DOT ?  Well lets see what Wikipedia says about DOT.

DOT is a plain text graph description language. It is a simple way of describing graphs that both humans and computer programs can use. DOT graphs are typically files that end with the .gv (or .dot) extension. The .gv extension is preferred in cases where there could be confusion with the .dot file extension used by early (pre-2007) versions of Microsoft Word.[1]

Having said that this is a really nifty and an amazing peace of code written to help people like me who can’t draw. I had to draw diagrams for few of the projects I have been involved in and I was looking for a way that I can achieve this without much effort.

DOT came to my rescue , it solved my problem to an extent I will try to give you example of how simple DOT code and expected output

<pre>digraph graphname {
a -> b -> c;
b -> d;
}</pre>

This is how the code looks like in DOT , but the output might astonish you .

dot2

 

This is the magic of DOT. Very less effort required yet you will get all the benefit of making a diagram. This for me is a boon.

The next thing which comes to rescue is ascii art, well lets agree to this that ASCII art is beautiful, you can draw ascii art either on http://asciiflow.com/ or for Vimmers there is a plugin DrawIt . These can be used to draw something which looks like ASCII drawing.

Selection_008

This is how ASCII art with vim looks like , now not only that , this ascii art can be converted into a png file which looks like rather is a image , for that for that we use something called Ditaa, a java library to convert ascii art into png image file. So after  using Ditaa, the art looks like this.

hello

I found it pretty cool, this is how you make txt to png, these tools really come handy when you are preparing some presentation or trying to visualize something or trying to explain something.

Do experiment with it and let me know your experience.

Keep coding!!:)

 

 

 

 

 


by fardroid23 at April 14, 2016 11:06 AM

April 12, 2016

Chandan Kumar

Lessons learned while packaging OpenStack's test sub-packages

On Mar 3, 2016, I started working on python-<openstack-service>-tests subpackage for all OpenStack Projects present in RDO.

It took me about a month to complete the whole task. But in this time interval, I have made lots of mistakes and learned a lot.

Below are my findings

RDO test sub-packages naming conventions

  • For openstack-<service> package, the test sub-package name is python-<service>-tests. python-<service> will be the required package.
  • If tests are maintained in a separate upstream project like <service>-tests, openstack-<service>-tests is the package name.

Placing the python test binaries at proper place

From %files macro of python-<service> subpackage, exclude tests and <service>_tempest_tests directories and include these directories under %files macro of python-<service>-tests subpackage.

The advantage of using %exclude is to avoid shipping twice the same files and creating conflicts.

%files -n python-<service>
%exclude %{python2_sitelib}/<service>/tests
%exclude %{python2_sitelib}/<service>_tempest_tests

%files -n python-<service>-tests
%{python2_sitelib}/<service>/tests
%{python2_sitelib}/<service>_tempest_tests

Use %license macro to place LICENSE

It is our common problem that we generally include LICENSE file under %doc macro which is still correct in any sub-package but %license has advantages like handling license specifics (a lot of duplication) and allowing some optimizations.

For more information check here : http://www.rpm.org/ticket/116

Do not do rm -rf <service>.egg-info

Last night, we faced a lot of problems due to this silly mistake. If we do rm -rf <service>.egg-info in %prep section, there are chances that test-fixtures (might required by tests) present under tests and <service>_tempest_tests directories does not get copied at %{python2_sitelib}/<service>/tests and %{python2_sitelib}/<service>_tempest_tests in python-<service>-tests subpackage and also causes subfolders not to be installed by setuptools.

So, think twice before you do this step in the spec file. For more information, check the Python Eggs from Fedora Python Packaging guidelines: <https://fedoraproject.org/wiki/Packaging:Python_Eggs>

Use rpmls command to verify the list of files with in a package

Use rpmls command from rpmdevtools package to check the files and their permissions included in the packages, so that you can fix later on based on your needs.

$ rpmls *.rpm

Use correct path in <service>_tempest_plugin

We had completed the packaging of python-<service>-tests sub-packages. When these packages are consumed in puppet-openstack-integration CI, some of the OpenStack Components is unable to discover tempest tests due to wrong path mentioned in the codebase. For Example: In mistral

# https://review.openstack.org/#/c/303792/1/mistral_tempest_tests/services/base.py
main_package = 'mistral'
# it should be
main_package = 'mistral_tempest_tests'

However, we have fixed the same in Zaqar and Mistral

That's it! Now all RDO OpenStack packages contain tests sub-packages.

Thanks to Alan, Javier, Haikel and Emilien for helping in getting this huge task done on time and always inspiring me to learn more.

by Chandan Kumar at April 12, 2016 04:12 PM

April 11, 2016

Sayan Chowdhury

Receiving Weechat Notifications on mobile via Pushover

I recently switched to use Weechat as my primary IRC client from X-Chat. I did a setup of Weechat on my Digital Ocean box.

Weechat setup turned out to be super simple and out of the box. I am running Weechat within a tmux session. But the problem I was facing was due to poor internet connection (thanks to Airtel for this and this was my primary reason for switching to weechat from Xchat) I got disconnected from the DO box quite often.

So, I looked over for a solution to get IRC notfications to my mobile device and Weechat seems to already have a script for that called pushover.pl.

So, The script pushes the notifications from weechat to your device via Pushover.

Installing the script

1 /script install pushover.pl

Create an account in Pushover, verify your email and create an application. Once the application is created you find your application token, and your user key.

Configuring

1 /set plugins.var.perl.pushover.token <your application token>
2 /set plugins.var.perl.pushover.user <your user key>

Now, your weechat is set to send messages through Pushover, install the application on your mobile device and you will start receiving the irc messages whenever you are mentioned or a private message.

The script also offers other customizations like

 1 'enabled' => ['on', "Turn script on or off"]
 2 'service' => ['pushover', 'Notification service to use.']
 3 'token' => ['', 'pushover API token/key']
 4 'user' => ['', "pushover user key"]
 5 'nma_apikey' => ['', "nma API key"]
 6 'pb_apikey' => ['', "Pushbullet API key"]
 7 'pb_device_iden' => ['', "Device Iden of pushbullet device"]
 8 'sound' => ['', "Sound (empty for default)"]
 9 'priority' => ['', "priority (empty for default)"]
10 'show_highlights' => ['on', 'Notify on highlights']
11 'show_priv_msg' => ['on', 'Notify on private messages']
12 'redact_priv_msg' => ['off', 'Hide the private message text']
13 'only_if_away' => ['off', 'Notify only if away status is active']
14 'only_if_inactive' => ['off', 'Notify only if buffer is not active']
15 'blacklist' => ['', 'Comma separated blacklist for notifications']
16 'verbose' => ['1', 'Verbosity level']
17 'rate_limit' => ['0', 'Rate limit in seconds']
18 'short_name' => ['off', 'Use short buffer name in notification']

April 11, 2016 06:14 AM

April 09, 2016

Tosin Damilare James Animashaun

After DjangoGirls, What Next?

These are my thoughts to the "girls" who stormed Lagos for Django. But I'd recommend same to any attendee of a DjangoGirls workshop anywhere.


My recent foray into the social circle of techies has proven to me that growth is often driven by community. Hence, the first advice I'll offer is that you take DjangoGirls back to your city.

The organizer of DjangoGirls Lagos, Aisha Bello herself only attended this event for the first time about a year ago. Isn't it wonderful that she's been able to put up two of such events within this period? Even though not everyone of you might be able to replicate what she has done, I encourage the few ones among you who can, to endeavour to.

Also endeavour to join communities; create them if they don't exist. For starters, the Nigeria Python Users Group has a mailing list where you can get updates on the Python community in Nigeria as well as a Slack community where you can interact with other programmers.


Did you get the contacts of your mentors? If you didn't, head over to the DjangoGirls Lagos page and get their Twitter handles. Bug them! Well, don't annoy them, but do not hesitate to ask them questions when you're stuck. They'd be glad to help, I'm sure.

And really, the learning goes both ways. Post-workshop, one of the participants of the workshop showed me an error she had encountered, and I was glad to learn that by tinkering with it, she found her way out of the maze. But that's not all. From seeing her approach, I picked up new knowledge from it too.


This post is meant to give you a quasi-roadmap, which you don't have to follow religiously but keep close enough to consult when you're lost.

So you learnt Python alongside its arguably most popular web-development framework: Django; and now you can code the next Facebook (Oh, were you told you could only build blogs with that new super power you picked up?) Now, I think the world has more blogging apps than we can keep track of, don't you think so?

So get creative; I assure you you've gotten past the first and most basic hurdle to creating just about any kind of web app: a social network or an e-commerce platform or something else that's interesting. Think of how important this is in an age when everything is moving to the web. You've definitely gotten a head start!

But you'd need to be prepared to learn new stuff as you go. Don't let that put you off as those things would be equally exciting. And you don't have to know it all before you begin; you can learn on-the-job.


Speaking of what you learnt at the workshop, I'm sure you know you were merely introduced to the technologies, not taught comprehensively. In my opinion, you may need to go over the whole tutorial again; then try to build something different -- like a ToDo application -- from the example shown. Afterwards, for some more comprehensive Python tutorial that is hands-on, try codecademy. It'll be fun, trust me.

There are several tutorials available as MOOCs or video tutorials on web platforms like Youtube, Edx, Udemy, Coursera, and Udacity among others. Who knows, you could build the next e-school for Africa. Pick any of these courses, and try to follow along. You don't have to be in a hurry, although you may find yourself skipping stuff you have already learnt.

I'll advise you pick up some Javascript as you go. I assure you that a mix of skills in these two languages will empower you so well.

I also recommend you put up blog posts as you learn new stuff as if to teach same to others (teaching is a proven way to better learn anything). Medium would be a good place to start, but there are several alternatives. You should also read blogs often. Let me mention that Django Girls has a blog you might be interested in checking out and so does PyLadies. See more interesting Python blogs here


During the workshop, I told my mentees that Python is a suitable language for such a workshop for three reasons:

  1. It's easy to learn.
  2. It's platform-independent.
  3. It has a lot of application domains.

Take caution not to misinterpret reason-1 to mean "easy to master" (See answer to "Is Python easy to master?"), especially because of reason-3: "Python has a lot of application domains". Be it scientific, systems administration, machine learning/artificial intelligence, statistical data analysis, game development or scripting, web scraping, and web development. For those with IoT in mind, especially with Raspberry Pi and or Arduino, Python is readily applicable to those platforms.

So you see there's quite a long way to go, yet with what little knowledge you've gained, you're able to achieve something worthwhile.


Moving on, you can share your work with others, and work collaboratively. You were introduced to version-controlling using Git and Github, which are well worth some learning time. You can learn Git through this course. Don't worry if you don't get it all at once, I struggled through this too at first. This video by Git evangelist, Scott Chacon also deals a good deal on the subject.


How much time it'd take to become quite comfortable with all of this would depend on three things:

  1. Your interest
  2. Your consistency
  3. Your learning aptitude

However, I'd say 6 months should be fine. Within this time you would have learnt enough to kick-start an exciting project. In fact, some people might have gotten halfway with some project in this time.


Good luck in your programming journey!

by Tosin Damilare James Animashaun at April 09, 2016 02:10 PM

April 08, 2016

Suraj Deshmukh

Setting up ElasticKube on CentOS

ElasticKube is ‘Enterprise container management for Kubernetes’ an option to various other open-source software projects like Nulecule, LocalKube, Ansible, etc. but only supports Kubernetes.

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You need a working Kubernetes cluster to setup ElasticKube on it. Easiest way to create a single node Kubernetes cluster, follow the steps.

$ git clone https://github.com/projectatomic/adb-atomic-developer-bundle.git
$ cd adb-atomic-developer-bundle/components/centos/centos-k8s-singlenode-setup/
$ vagrant up
$ vagrant ssh

Now you have a Vagrant Box with running Kubernetes cluster on it.                                             m7S2-kubernetes

To setup ElasticKube follow following instructions. Disable SELinux first, because without this ElasticKube won’t run, this is a security risk but for testing purposes you can disable it.

$ sudo setenforce 0

Create namespace named “kube-system”

$ cat namespace.yaml
kind: "Namespace"
apiVersion: "v1"
metadata:
  name: "kube-system"
  labels:
    name: "kube-system"

Install ElasticKube

$ curl -s https://elastickube.com | bash

When successfully installed, note the IP address at the end of the above command, which says “Please complete the installation here: http://10.254.177.213“.

Find the IP address of this machine

$ ip a sh eth0

Open new terminal and create a SSH port-forwarding this is done so that you can access the ElasticKube running inside the Vagrant Box.

$ ssh -L 'some-port':'IP-address-from-output':80 vagrant@'IP-address-of-VM'
password: vagrant

e.g.

$ ssh -L 9898:10.254.177.213:80 vagrant@192.168.121.24

Now open browser and goto localhost:9898 and you are good to go.

 

Ref:


by surajssd009005 at April 08, 2016 06:40 AM

April 04, 2016

Shakthi Kannan

Introduction to GNU Emacs

[Published in Open Source For You (OSFY) magazine, July 2015 edition.]

Introduction

GNU Emacs is a very popular text editor written in C and Emacs Lisp. It can be run on many platforms, and can be easily customised and extended for user needs. It was created by Richard Stallman, the founder of the GNU project. This article is the first in a series on how to use it. There are a number of tutorials available for GNU Emacs; this series of articles provide one approach to understanding and learning the software. You are encouraged to refer to the official GNU Emacs reference manual for more information, and it supersedes everything. Here are a few interesting quotes on Emacs.

“I use Emacs, which might be thought of as a thermonuclear word processor” – Neal Stephenson (In the Beginning… Was the Command Line)

“Emacs is undoubtedly the most powerful programmer’s editor in existence. It’s a big, feature-laden program with a great deal of flexibility and customizability. … Emacs has an entire programming language inside it that can be used to write arbitrarily powerful editor functions.” – Eric S. Raymond (from ‘The Art of UNIX Programming’)

“Personally, I feel inspired whenever I open Emacs. Like a craftsman entering his workshop, I feel a realm of possibility open before me. I feel the comfort of an environment that has evolved over time to fit me perfectly - an assortment of packages and keybindings which help me bring ideas to life day after day.” – Daniel Higginbotham (in ‘Clojure for the Brave and True’)

“EMACS could not have been reached by a process of careful design, because such processes arrive only at goals which are visible at the outset, and whose desirability is established on the bottom line at the outset. Neither I nor anyone else visualized an extensible editor until I had made one, nor appreciated its value until he had experienced it. EMACS exists because I felt free to make individually useful small improvements on a path whose end was not in sight.” – Richard Stallman

Installation

You can use your favourite GNU/Linux distribution package manager to install GNU Emacs. On Debian/Ubuntu, you can install with the following command:

$ sudo apt-get install emacs

On Fedora, you can use the Yum package manager as shown below:

$ sudo yum install emacs

The emerge tool can install GNU Emacs on Gentoo, as follows:

# emerge --ask app-editors/emacs

On Arch, the Pacman software can help you in installing GNU Emacs:

$ sudo pacman -S emacs

Use the Zypper package manager in SUSE as shown below:

$ sudo zypper install emacs

Startup

If you use the Unity interface, you can search for emacs in the Dash, and it will show the Emacs icon that you can click to open the editor. This is illustrated in the following figure.

Unity Emacs search image

On the Metacity interface or any other desktop environment with a panel, you can open GNU Emacs from “Applications” -> “Accessories” -> “Emacs” as shown below:

Metacity Emacs

You can also open the editor from the terminal by simply typing ‘emacs’ and hitting the return key.

$ emacs

The version that I have used for this article is GNU Emacs 24.3.1.

Exit

To exit from GNU Emacs, you need to use C-c C-q, where ‘C’ stands for the Control key. You can also use your mouse and close the editor by clicking on the ‘x’, but, GNU Emacs was designed to be completely usable with a keyboard, and I am going to encourage you to only use the keyboard shortcuts.

Concepts

While you can work using GUI editors, I am going to teach you to work entirely on the keyboard to experience the power of shortcuts in GNU Emacs. You can disconnect the mouse and your touchpad when working on GNU Emacs. Just as an exercise, I’d encourage you to remove your mouse completely and see how you can work with a computer for one day. You will realise that a lot of user interfaces are heavily dependent and designed for mouse interactions! By only using the keyboard, you can be blazingly fast and productive.

The keyboard shortcuts in GNU Emacs may seem to involve many keys. But, please bear with me on this, because the way the shortcuts are designed, you will be able to remember them easily. As you practice, you will gain insight into how consistently they have been defined.

GNU Emacs is a ‘stateless’ editor for the most part. By ‘stateless’, I mean that there are no specific state transitions that need to happen before you can use the commands. There does exist the concept of modes. When you open GNU Emacs, you will see menus, buffer and a mode line as illustrated in the following figure:

Emacs default screen

As mentioned earlier, we will not be clicking on the menus or icons with a mouse, but only use keyboard shortcuts. Everything is a buffer in GNU Emacs. Each buffer can have one major mode and one or more minor modes. The mode determines the keyboard shortcuts that are applicable primarily on the buffer. Examples of major modes are given below:

Mode Description
Text mode Writing text
HTML mode Writing HTML
cc mode Writing C, C++ and C-like programs
Dired mode Handling files and directories
Shell mode Working with shell
LaTeX mode Formatting TeX and LaTeX files
Picture mode Creating ASCII art
Outline mode Writing outlines
SQL mode Interacting with SQL databases
Lisp mode Writing Lisp programs

The mode line exists below the buffer and it gives you a lot of information on the status of the buffer, such as what modes are active and other useful information. Below the mode line is the mini-buffer, where any commands you issue are indicated and prompts for user input are shown. This is the overall view of the default GNU Emacs interface.

In today’s user interface applications, an application is treated as a window on a desktop. But, when you open GNU Emacs, you are actually opening a frame. A frame can be split it into many windows. Everything is a buffer in GNU Emacs. So, you can have many frames of GNU Emacs, and inside each you can have one or more windows containing buffers (or files).

Features

Although GNU Emacs was designed primarily for text editing, it can do a lot more. ‘A lot’ is probably a highly simplified term. It has got support for syntax highlighting for a large number of programming languages. You can also generate code snippets from templates using the yasnippet package. You can also enter markup or markdown text. There is support for indentation of text and programs depending on the programming languages and modes. Internationalization support is available, and you can use it to even enter text in Indian languages.

A number of configurations are available for setting it up for your development work, including automating tasks for compiling, executing, testing and deployment. When you become familiar with Emacs Lisp, you can implement your own modules. Since, it is Lisp, it is also easily extensible. You can write your own macros to perform repeated tasks. You can also query an inbuilt help system for information, shortcuts, tutorials and other documentation. You are not at all dependent on the Internet for information, and thus you can work offline too. Version control support is available for many centralized (cvs, svn) and decentralized systems (Git, Hg).

org-mode is a very popular mode for managing your notes. You can use it for planning your day-to-day activities. GNU Emacs can be used as publishing software. You can create wikis, blogs and publish books using it. This article is written using org-mode. Spell-checking modules are also available for your documentation needs. It is also possible to export plain text into a number of formats (PDF, HTML etc.).

A number of Emacs lisp packages are available for networking. You can use Gnus for checking your e-mails, and reading and writing to newsgroups. Emacs Relay Chat (ERC) can be used for connecting to Internet Relay Chat (IRC) channels. There are modules that support the Jabber protocol for communicating with chat servers. There is also support for viewing Web pages inside Emacs. There are a large number of Emacs modules available through package repositories such as MELPA (melpa.org), and Marmalada (marmalade-repo.org).

History

The first version of Emacs (macros) was written by Richard Stallman and Guy L. Steele, Jr. in 1976 for the TECO editor in MIT. It was written in a low-level language for the PDP-10 assembler. People were able to freely hack on the code, make improvements and share their changes. This was the original hacker culture that existed in MIT. Unfortunately, business entities started to make software proprietary and this hacker culture ceased to exist, especially in the MIT AI labs. Richard Stallman wanted to revive the hacker culture and started the GNU project. He wrote the second implementation of the editor entirely in C in 1984, and released it as the first program of the GNU project. Today, it is a very popular editor that is widely used, and has more than 570 contributors. The official web site for GNU Emacs is at http://www.gnu.org/software/emacs/.

April 04, 2016 03:15 PM

March 26, 2016

Anwesha Das

D DAY, speaking for the first time at FOSSASIA 2016

I may divide the whole FOSSASIA 2016 into two parts day 0 and 2 and day 1, the day when was my talk. This was the first time while I was giving a talk in FOSS conference. The title for my talk was “Anatomy of a Software Patent for a FOSS Developer”.

The day before the talk I came early just after the talks of the day 0 got over, without joining the other speakers, friends for dinner, I had a talk to prepare. But though came early only could start to practice it after Py slept with I guess with the help of gripe water at 12:30 am. I was trying to give the talk again again in front of the bathroom mirror. But I was messing up every time. I could not even speak a single word without stammering and fumbling . Even my name was somehow seemed unknown to me. I thought it was the big mirrors on the bathroom wall is causing the problem. I came out but hell the room has mirrors everywhere. In the room the other problem was my sleeping beauty, who might just wake up with little sound and her busy working daddy. So I just got inside my safe den. I was trying to speak a loudly, and calling Kushal in every 10 minutes or so to check if I was doing right or not. At 2:00 AM Kushal just dragged me to bed saying that I should get a nice sleep to get it right tomorrow.

19th morning when I woke up I was the first thing that came to mind was “ ohh today is the day, and I have exactly 7 hours to give the talk”. That single thought worked better than a can of Red Bull. Kushal was ready to go, he had the Python track to run. But Py was sleeping and one of us had to stay with her, so I stayed. I thought I will be able to practice more. But my little troublemaker just woke up and started crying for a reason best known to her. So, I nursed her and mumbled my talk for the next two and half hours. In the meantime I cried, I begged my little daughter to leave me, I got angry on kushal and my mom that why they are not here and for a moment I thought why did they selected my talk and why I have started studying something new leaving my good old mortgage field and so on. After Py let me go I made Py and me ready, made Py’s lunch and snack and just ran to the MRT station.

I reached the conference center at 1PM. By then I had already missed the group photo. I was feeling sad. Hong Phuc informed that Kushal was really worried that why I was not there by then. I had only an hour to feed Py and eat my lunch. Me and Kushal we both were adjuring Py to have it fast some of our friends also joined the mission. Py being Py was in mood to play and not to eat.

After lunch episode got over we three and Harish went to the internet, society and community tarck, Enistine Room upstairs, where I had my talk.There Harish showed me his first computer, which is almost 6 years older to me. It was awesome. It was fascinating to realize that from where we have come and where we have reached. Anivar gave a talk on net neutrality and India’s battle against it. It was an enlightening talk about the save the internet campaign, what was TRAI’s take on it and what is the present scenario here. The next talk was about ensuring patent non-aggression in Linux and Open Source Software Project by Keith Bergelt , CEO, Open Invention Network. The talk gave us an inside of the goal OIN aims to achieve and how does it work.

My first talk

Then came my turn. I was nervous, my hands were cold. I thought why shouldn’t I just ran. Luckily Py went off to sleep that time, thank you so much darling. The moderator for the room just helped me to set up.At the beginning only I confessed that this is my first talk and I am scared. Thanks to all my friends out there, now I can surely call them “friends”, they cheered me with a round of applause. I started giving my talk. That helped me a lot to overcome my initial fear. But as soon as I reached the middle of my talk suddenly I got conscious. I thought “ohh I am actually delivering the talk, am I boring, are the audience still interested, am I fumbling too much, am I audible?”. That made me look on my computer screen instead of making an eye contact to the audience, and that went wrong. Anyways I finished my talk and then realized that it was not that bad, because people did understand and asking too many questions. Like Cat Allman asked “What is a Plant Patent?” As I mentioned it in the “kind code of patent number” section. Someone asked “how can we judge if our idea is unique or not?” And there were some more questions.

After giving the talk I felt lightweight, all my worries were gone. I asked for the feedback to my biggest critic, whose face was kind of happy and was a big relief. Then I had chat with Keith who told me that he liked it. So it was the biggest compliment I can ever ask for.

Then we had to rush to the other floor because Kushal had his Python 3 workshop their. Py was awake by that time and every time Kushal was saying Python she used to think that she has been called. She used to scream “Babai” ( that is Daddy” ) at the top of her voice. So I had to leave the room. I tried to listen the panel discussion, where Harish said that he wants to run the panel in a democratic manner and everyone can put forward their opinion. Py took it seriously and screamed as loudly she could. So again I became homeless. I really wanted Kushal to finish his workshop fast, but he took his time. As soon as he finished his workshop I just I handed over Py to him and ran for the Panel Discussion. Thankfully I could catch the later parts of it.

Then I rest of the day was not that eventful except Py making her first public speech and drinking from beer someone’s leftover can.

This was my first time giving talk in a FOSS conference. I guess next time I will not be much scared, I will not fight with Kushal for silly reasons, I will not fumble. But that will not be my first. The feeling of accomplishment will not be the same. I guess I will not be in short of words to describe my feelings while writing the blog posts about them and the blog posts will not be this big of course. I guess everyone who has ever given a talk has gone through this nerve racking phase. So, whoever is going to give their first talk practice, practice and practice and even then if you feel jittery, it is totally natural. Whatsoever 19th March, 2016 will hold a special place in my memory for the rest of my life.

by Anwesha Das at March 26, 2016 07:42 PM