Planet dgplug

October 23, 2014

Kushal Das

More Fedora in life

I am using Fedora from the very first release. Started contributing to the project from around 2005. I worked on Fedora during my free time, I did that before I joined Red Hat in 2008, during the time I worked in Red Hat and after I left Red Hat last year.

But for the last two weeks I am working on Fedora not only on my free times but also as my day job. I am the Fedora Cloud Engineer as a part of Fedora Engineering team and part of the amazing community of long time Fedora Friends.

by Kushal Das at October 23, 2014 09:46 AM

Using docker in Fedora for your development work

Last week I worked on DNF for the first time. In this post I am going to explain how I used Docker and a Fedora cloud instance for the same.

I was using a CentOS vm as my primary work system for last two weeks and I had access to a cloud. I created a Fedora 20 instance there.

The first step was to install docker in it and update the system, I also had to upgrade the selinux-policy package and reboot the instance.

# yum upgrade selinux-policy -y; yum update -y
# reboot
# yum install docker-io
# systemctl start docker
# systemctl enable docker

Then pull in the Fedora 21 Docker image.

# docker pull fedora:21

The above command will take time as it will download the image. After this we will start a Fedora 21 container.

# docker run -t -i fedora:21 /bin/bash

We will install all the required dependencies in the image, use yum as you do normally and then get out by pressing Crrl+d.

[root@3e5de622ac00 /]# yum install dnf python-nose python-mock cmake -y

Now we can commit this as a new image so that we can reuse it in the future. We do this by docker commit command.

#  docker commit -m "with dnf" -a "Kushal Das" 3e5de622ac00 kushaldas/dnfimage

After this the only thing left to start a container with this newly created image and mounted directory from host machine.

# docker run -t -i -v /opt/dnf:/opt/dnf kushaldas/dnfimage /bin/bash

This command assumes the code is already in the /opt/dnf of the host system. Even if I managed to do something bad in that container, my actual host is safe. I just have to get out of the container and start a new one.

by Kushal Das at October 23, 2014 09:30 AM